Angkor Wat

angkor_wat
Angkor Wat in Cambodia
the world's largest religious monument built in the 12th century
now a world heritage site
View photos....

Today 267
Yesterday1864
This week 4925
Last week 14032
This month 39484
Last month 54877
Total 4132304
Visitors Counter
 

Amok-Cuisine-Final-Logo

How to Extract Tamarind Juice

Ripe Tamarind Fruits
and Juice/Purée

Tamarind takes its name from the Arabic, tamarhindi, meaning "Indian Date. It is the fruit/pod of a tall shady tree native to Asia and northern Africa.  Apart from being eaten in its fresh form - green or ripe, it is also used in sauces, curries, soups, marinades, pickles, candies and drinks.  It is one of the staple ingredients in Southeast Asian cuisines. And, it is an integral ingredient in Worcestershire sauce.

Did you know …
Tamarind has a high content of acid, sugar, B vitamins, and interestingly for a fruit, calcium. It has been proved to possess many medicinal properties. The list of ailments and illness that can be cured by tamarind is endless.

Note
 This recipe is only a guideline to give you an idea about the ratio of tamarind and water used. So, adjust it accordingly if more juice is required. (Note: if freshly ripe tamarind fruit is used instead, increase the amount of  tamarind ratio  to compensate for the seeds it contains).

Ingredient_-_Tamarind_Block_-_thumbnail
Tamarind Block

ingredient_-__tamarind_juice_-_thumbnail
Concentrated
Tamarind Juice

 

Here are two methods on how to extract tamarind juice – for immediate use and also for freezing:

Method 1 (for immediate use)
From tamarind block1 1 Tbsp – about 24g (nearly 1 oz)
Hot water 5 Tbsp

Yields about 4 Tbsp2

1 - In a small bowl or glass, add the tamarind and 4 tablespoons of the water. Leave to soak for at least 5 minutes until the tamarind is soft and soggy. Then mash thoroughly with a fork.

2 - Strain the juice from the tamarind mixture through a sieve into a little bowl. Extract as much juice as possible by pressing it with the back of a spoon. Set the juice aside.

3 – To ensure that the juice is completely extracted, return the tamarind to the first bowl, add the remaining 1 tablespoon of water, mash again for 10 seconds, and then strain the juice into the little bowl using the same sieve. Discard the remnants of the tamarind.

You should now have about 4 tablespoons of tamarind juice/purée. This only keeps for one day at room temperature. It can however be kept for a few more days in the refrigerator by sprinkling a pinch of salt on it.

Method 2(for freezing)
Tamarind block1 200g (7 oz), broken into small pieces
Hot water 2 cups

Yields a little less than 2 cups2 of tamarind juice/purée

1 - Put the tamarind in a bowl and pour in 1.5 cup of hot water. Leave to soak for 25-30 minutes or until the tamarind is soft and soggy. Then mash it thoroughly with a fork – about 2-3 minutes.  

2 – Strain the juice from the tamarind mixture through a sieve into a smaller bowl. Extract as much juice as possible from the tamarind by pressing it with the back of a spoon. Set the juice aside.

3 – To ensure that the juice is completely extracted, return the tamarind to the first bowl, add the remaining water, mash again for one minute, and then strain the juice into the little bowl using the same sieve. Discard the remnants of the tamarind. You should now have about 2 cups of tamarind juice/purée which you can freeze in 2 tablespoon portions for example in ice-cube tray and defrost them as needed.

Tip:
1  I use tamarind block instead of the fresh ripe fruits here because it is widely available in Asian grocery stores and is easier to work with. This is because the fruits have been shelled, deveined, and deseeded. If kept in an air-tight container, in a cool, dark, dry aerated place, they will stay moist for a long time.

2 The resulting amount of tamarind juice is a bit less than the water input because some water has been absorbed by the fruit itself.

To save time and for convenience, you can use a pre-prepared ‘Concentrated tamarind juice’ (see picture on the left) available in tubs or jars at Asian grocery stores. But this is not as healthy as the tamarind block.